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CSE 538 (Modeling and Performance Evaluation of Interconnected Computer Systems)


Course Description

Modern computing systems consist of multiple interconnected components, which all influence performance. The focus of this course is on developing modeling tools aimed at understanding how to design and provision such systems to meet certain performance or efficiency targets, and the trade-offs involved. The course covers Markov chains and their applications to simple queues, and proceeds to explore more complex systems including server farms and how to optimize their performance through scheduling and task assignment policies. The course includes a brief review of the necessary probability and mathematical concepts. Prerequisite: ESE 326

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Announcements

ALL ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE POSTED ON THE PIAZZA COURSE PAGE

Textbook(s)

M. Harchol-Balter, "Performance Modeling and Design of Computer Systems." Cambridge University Press (2013), ISBN: 978-1-107-02750-3

Logistics

  • Class times and location: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:00am-11:30am in Lopata 103.
    • First class is on Tuesday August 30, 2016, and last class is on Thursday December 8, 2016.
  • Class grading: Review problems 5%; Homeworks 20%, Quizzes 20%; Midterm 25%; Final 30%
  • Instructor: Roch Guerin, Jolley 304C, email: guerin@wustl.edu
    • Office hours: Monday 4:00-5:00pm & Wednesday 4:00-5:00pm in Jolley 304C
  • TAs and office hours: TBD, if any
  • Late policy: Homeworks and review problems are expected to be turned in at the start of class on their due date. There will be no exception and no partial credit. On an exceptional basis, if you are unable to make it to class, you can turn in your homework in the CSE department office (Jolley 304). Give your assignment to one of the department staff, and ask them to sign and timestamp it. The timestamp must precede the start time of the class.
  • Asking questions: You can obviously ask face-to-face questions during any of the office hours, but the other and possibly better means to get your questions answered is to use the Piazza site setup for the course (you will need to register to be able to access it). The TA (if any) and I will monitor the site and do our best to answer questions in a timely manner. Posting questions on Piazza has the advantage that questions and answers are available to all students, and it is often the case that if you have a question, other students have a similar one. Because of that, neither the TA nor I will respond to email questions. So please use the Piazza site as much as you can and don't hesitate to ask as many questions as you need to; there is no such thing as a dumb question.
  • Midterm exam*: Tuesday October 25, 2016, in class.
  • Final exam*: Tuesday December 20, 2016, 6:00-8:00pm in TBD.
  • ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: Please make sure you are familiar with Washington University Academic Integrity Policy, as it will be strictly applied.

* EXCEPT FOR PROPERLY DOCUMENTED MEDICAL OR FAMILY EMERGENCY REASONS, THERE WILL BE NO MAKE-UP TIMES FOR EXAMS OR QUIZZES. YOU NEED TO ARRANGE OTHER ACTIVITIES SO AS TO AVOID CONFLICTS.

University Policies & Resources on Sexual Assault, Bias, and Mental Health

Accommodations based upon sexual assault:

The University is committed to offering reasonable academic accommodations to students who are victims of sexual assault. Depending on the specific nature of the allegation, such measures may include but are not limited to: implementation of a no-contact order, course/classroom assignment changes, and other academic support services and accommodations. If you need to request such accommodations, please direct your request to Kim Webb (kim_webb@wustl.edu), Director of the Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center. Ms. Webb is a confidential resource; however, requests for accommodations will be shared with the appropriate University administration and faculty. The University will maintain as confidential any accommodations or protective measures provided to an individual student so long as it does not impair the ability to provide such measures.

Bias Reporting:

The University has a process through which students, faculty, staff and community members who have experienced or witnessed incidents of bias, prejudice or discrimination against a student can report their experiences to the University’s Bias Report and Support System (BRSS) team. See: diversityinclusion.wustl.edu/brss/

Mental Health:

Mental Health Services’ professional staff members work with students to resolve personal and interpersonal difficulties, many of which can affect the academic experience. These include conflicts with or worry about friends or family, concerns about eating or drinking patterns, and feelings of anxiety and depression. See: shs.wustl.edu/MentalHealth